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Monday, October 31, 2011

Silver as a Hedge Against Tuition Hikes

A small percentage of U.S. College students are buying Silver as a hedge against future tuition hikes. It is true that investments in Silver and Gold are quite risky. With youth, however, this risk is mitigated. Statistically, wwning silver, gold and precious metals has beem one of the safest ways to protect and grow a family's private wealth. Today, however, some savvy students are investing in Silver and other metals as a hedge against rising tuition. Students can follow the NAAS NEWS Blog for free advice, opinions, and strategy as to how students may go about buying and owning Silver.
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Public Charter Schools Now Enrolling At Least 30 Percent of Students in a Record Six School Districts Nationwide

A record number of school districts—six—have at least 30 percent of their public school students enrolled in public charter schools, according to an annual report released Monday by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (NAPCS) entitled A Growing Movement: American's Largest Charter School Communities – Sixth Annual Edition. In addition, an all-time high of 18 school districts have more than 20 percent of their public school students enrolled in charter schools.

Dramatic Shift in the K-12 education market

The K-12 education market has been undergoing an unprecedented, multi-dimensional shift in the past couple of years. A combination of powerful political, economic, and technological forces is in play, creating a significant and non-reversible change in the culture and overall way of conducting business in the market.

Friday, October 28, 2011

Despite a relatively small award pool ($500 million), 35 states, D.C, and Puerto Rico submitted applications for the Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge, a joint program of the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services. The interest reflects the states' high interest in moving their early childhood programs forward. The applicants were required to create comprehensive plans to improve early learning and development programs around five key areas of reform: establishing successful state systems, defining high-quality, accountable programs, promoting early learning and development outcomes for children, supporting the early childhood education workforce, and measuring outcomes and progress. Applications will undergo peer review by early childhood experts from across the country with winners announced in mid-December. Awards will range from around $50 million up to $100 million, depending on a state's population of children from low-income families and proposed plan

Monday, October 24, 2011

New national standards released today provide states, districts, online programs and other organizations with a set of guidelines for ensuring quality online courses in K-12 education. The guidelines, which were issued in the report National Standards for Quality Online Courses, Version 2, were released by a committee of experts established by the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL).
Are you still trying to decide if you want to pursue social media marketing plunge? Sandy Fivecoat, Founder of the WeAreTeachers online community for educators, suggests that companies that target teachers and educators should pursue this option. The bottom line of her findings: more marketers are investing in social media and using it for lead generation. For example, National Academy of American Scholars has invested in a Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and even MySpace presense.
We encourage all students to follow important senatorial sessions that affect education or student financing. Senator Harkin (D-IA), chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, has released a draft of the Senate ESEA reauthorization proposal. The bill is scheduled for markup in the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee on October 18. As might be expected, the proposal does not suit everyone. The civil rights community is worried about an apparent backing off from accountability targets; a number of Republicans believe the federal role is still much too large, despite added flexibility provisions; and teacher advocates have concerns about the teacher evaluation process. State and local education agencies and state governors seem pleased to be relieved of some of the more onerous aspects of NCLB, but have their own concerns about other aspects of the proposal. It's also not at all clear how this comprehensive legislation will (or could) be reconciled with the more piecemeal approach the House of Representatives is taking, though that concern may be premature, as first the bill has to make its way out of the Senate